The Truth About Web Hosting – Really Unlimited?

Here’s the Truth About Web Hosting – REALLY

bored face simple black and white - appalled to find out the truth about web hostingYou want the truth about web hosting? Here it is. I contacted three of the “big boys” of web hosting via their chat services, and here’s what I found. The chats are nearly in their original state, with a few corrections for the sake of readability. My conclusion follows.


Chat #1 with Inmotion Hosting

11:43:24 PM [BL] Hello, my name is BL! Thank you for contacting InMotion Hosting!

11:41:25 PM [Bob] Hi. I see you have unlimited bandwidth.

11:44:02 PM [BL] Yes Bob that is correct. Our shared hosting shares the CPU, memory, disk space and bandwidth. There are no limitations set on each shared account for the disk space and bandwidth.

11:44:02 PM [Bob] what does that mean exactly?

11:45:22 PM [BL] What that means is you are on a shared hosting environment which has a priority system to the shared CPU and memory. If you were to use all of your allotted resources, you would need to upgrade. You would run out of allotted resource before you used up so much bandwidth that it affects other sites on the shared servers.

11:45:39 PM [Bob] so what is limited then?

11:45:45 PM [Bob] CPU?

11:46:08 PM [Bob] Memory?

11:46:15 PM [Bob] how are those limits set?

11:47:21 PM [BL] Those limits are set on a priority based system to the shared CPU and as far as memory you have burstible up to 512 MB.

11:47:55 PM [Bob] So you have a way to measure CPU usage but can’t really explain it in numbers or words?

11:47:58 PM [BL] Because there is no hard number to provide you, could you please let me know what you plan to do and I can advise you on the best environment for your project.

11:48:09 PM [BL] Correct, most shared hosting environments do not have a way to provide that accurately.

11:48:22 PM [Bob] Oh. Hm. What if I get 1,000 unique visitors each day on a WordPress website

11:49:09 PM [BL] That would be fine if your site is primarily static in nature. If your site were fairly dynamic ( streaming multimedia, high e-commerce) you might be leaning towards VPS.

11:49:28 PM [BL] So because the project you are describing is literally in the gray area between the VPS and Shared solutions.

11:49:48 PM [Bob] Hm. OK.

11:50:19 PM [BL] To a single WordPress site, I typically do not recommend being on shared if you are getting more than 500 unique visitors. That being said, when we are in this “gray area” I recommend starting on Power or Pro, and if you use all of your resources, upgrading to the VPS.

11:50:33 PM [Bob] Hm. OK. Another question. If I have a terabyte of pictures I want to upload (family pictures for a family website) is that OK? Because you have unlimited storage space right?

11:53:42 PM [BL] Unfortunately you would not be able to have that many files stored. We do not allow our servers for file storage. If you had a low volume site with 1TB of storage, that would be considered file sharing which is against our terms of service.

11:53:58 PM [Bob] oh, so it’s not unlimited storage then

11:54:42 PM [Bob] it wouldn’t be for file storage. I already have them backed up on my home computer three times. It would be for my family website

11:56:22 PM [BL] Bob, you can’t put 1TB of storage on a shared server, anywhere in the world. For perspective, a 1TB server with us is over $200.00 per month. Besides the fact that a family website with 1TB of storage would be considered file storage, the amount of inodes created by 1TB of storage, is enough in itself to use too many resources.

11:56:50 PM [Bob] I see. So the “unlimited storage space” is a marketing ploy

11:56:52 PM [Bob] OK last question

11:57:01 PM [BL] Absolutely Bob! What is it?

11:57:56 PM [Bob] why does your VPS-3000S have 200GB of storage for $75 and and 4TB of bandwidth and your $7 shared plan have “unlimited” storage and “unlimited” bandwidth? Doesn’t make sense.

11:58:34 PM [Bob] Sorry to be a pain. Just trying to figure this all out before I decide what to do.

11:58:47 PM [BL] The VPS provides dedicated resources (CPU and MEMORY) that would be required for a website that is 200GB large.

11:59:17 PM [BL] Basically, if you are over the 50GB range, and do not have enough traffic to be over your resource limits, you would probably be asked to move up or shut down due to file storage.

11:59:51 PM [BL] Unlimited is based on the fact that there is a hard drive or series of hard drive ranging greatly in the number of TB on the drives.

12:00:16 AM [Bob] I see. Interesting stuff. Thank you for the education. Much appreciated.

12:00:23 AM [BL] For example. Lets say we have a shared server with 100GB on it. We could put 100 customers on it with “unlimited storage” when statistics say that 80 percent of them would be using less than 1GB.

12:00:34 AM [BL] Does that make sense?

12:00:36 AM [Bob] Right. I get it now.

12:00:50 AM [Bob] But honestly, it’s false marketing. That bugs me a little but all the hosts use the same tactics

12:01:15 AM [BL] I understand and I do apologize about that. It is common practice in the industry and I think our marketing team is trying to keep pace with the competitions’ strategies.

12:01:24 AM [Bob] Unless you jump up to an expensive managed host and then they honestly list all their limitations right up front.

12:01:30 AM [Bob] yes, I understand what you’re up against

12:01:36 AM [Bob] with the “keeping up” part

12:01:39 AM [Bob] thanks for the honesty

12:01:53 AM [BL] Absolutely Bob, I wish our website was as straight forward for you!

12:02:10 AM [Bob] OK have a good night. This was a pit-stop on my way to figure out which host to go with. Thanks again. Goodnight.


Chat #2 With Bluehost

[Initial Question] Provider: Bluehost – My Domain is: “Not specified.” I have some questions about hosting.

(22:29) [System] Customer has entered chat and is waiting for an agent.

(22:29) [AD] Hello, how can I help you?

(22:29) [Bob] hi there. Can you tell me what bandwidth is? I see you have unlimited bandwidth and I want to know what that means.

(22:30) [AD] Bandwidth is the rate of data transfer, bit rate or throughput, measured in bits per second (bit/s)

(22:31) [Bob] oh, so is that like visitors visiting my pages?

(22:31) [AD] Right.

(22:32) [Bob] OK. I see. So that means I can have unlimited hits?

(22:33) [AD] Correct.

(22:33) [Bob] Great.. OK. So 1,000,000 hits per month wouldn’t be any problem for your shared plans?

(22:34) [AD] As long as it stays within the cpu limits.

(22:35) [Bob] What are the CPU limits?

(22:35) [AD] We have CPU throttling implemented which only affects what we consider overly abusive users for a shared hosting environment. This means if you use more then 7% of an 8 core setup your account will be throttled until your CPU usage comes down.

(22:35) [Bob] what would happen if my account was “throttled”

(22:35) [Bob] And how do you measure CPU usage?

(22:36) [AD] The site would become slow or suspended until the processes return to normal.

(22:36) [AD] I don’t have the exact details for how our admins monitor the usage, unfortunately.

(22:36) [Bob] So how do you measure an “overly abusive user”

(22:36) [AD.] If they exceed the 7% mentioned above.

(22:37) [Bob] How is the 7% measured? I’m not trying to be a pain, I just don’t get it.

(22:38) [AD] How it is monitored will vary from account due to the programs and content that is running on the hosting service.

(22:39) [Bob] Hm. OK. Well, the site I’m considering transferring gets about 1,000-1,500 unique visitors per day. So that should be just fine for your shared hosting right?

(22:39) [AD] Yes, that would be no problem.

(22:39) [Bob] OK. I also have about 500GB of pictures to upload. That would be no problem right because you have unlimited storage on your shared hosting.

(22:40) [AD] Correct.

(22:41) [Bob] great! I’m surprised because your VPS plans which cost $60 per month only have 60GB of storage. Weird.

(22:42) [AD] Well, there are still limits with the shared account.

(22:42) [AD] There is a limit of 200,000 files, no limit for file size.

(22:43) [AD] So that is where the unlimited storage comes into effect, no limit for the file size.

(22:43) [AD] Every plan is ultimately going to have some sort of limitation in some respect.

(22:43) [Bob] Oh. Why are there no limits on storage space with the shared plans but there is a 60GB limit on your VPS plans which cost about twenty times as much?

(22:44) [Bob] There is also a 2 TB limit on bandwidth on your VPS plan that I’m referring to (enhanced). But there is no limit on bandwidth on the shared plan. That’s really weird.

(22:45) [AD] Shared accounts also have about 1,000+ users on the account.

(22:45) [AD] Each plan is meant for or created for different things.

(22:45) [AD] A vps plan allows for more control over a what a user can install and run on the account.

(22:46) [AD] Basically, think of it as a partition to a dedicated server.

(22:46) [AD] Where, again, a shared account is a single server with about 1000+ accounts sharing the resources.

(22:47) [Bob] OK. So let me get this straight. I can upload terabytes of files onto a shared server, but only 60GB on a VPS which costs twenty times as much. And I can have unlimited visitors (which you said was the same as bandwidth) on a shared plan but I am limited to 2TB on a plan that costs twenty times as much!

(22:47) [AD] I wouldn’t suggest trying to host terabytes on a shared account.

(22:47) [Bob] This makes no sense whatsoever. Who in the world would agree to something like that?

(22:47) [AD] That’s where it would come into play of overusing shared resources.

(22:48) [Bob] OK. Now that I’m completely confused, I think I will go.

(22:48) [AD] Tb’s of information would be better suited for a dedicated server.

(22:48) [Bob] Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions.


Chat #3 with HostGator (wait time 52 minutes!)

(11:58 pm) [System] Customer has entered chat and is waiting for an agent.

(12:50 am) [JJ] Welcome to HostGator Live Chat. My name is Jason J and I’d be glad to assist you with any questions you may have about hosting today.

(12:50 am) [Bob]: hi there. I have a question about your shared hosting. I see you have unlimited bandwidth. What does that mean? Unlimited traffic?

(12:51 am) [Bob]: hello?

(12:52 am) [Bob]: Is anyone there?

(12:52 am) [Bob]: I have been waiting for 52 minutes to talk to you.

(12:54 am) [Bob]: Hello? Is this sales? I have a few questions.

(12:55 am) [JJ.] All of servers have 100mbps up and down, so that is the physical limit for how much data you can use at a single time, however, there is no limit over time.

(12:55 am) [Bob]: OK how does that transfer into site traffic? I don’t have any idea what you’re saying. If I get 1,500 unique visitors each day on a WordPress site, would that be fine for your shared hosting plans?

(12:57 am) [JJ] Certainly, as long as your site is well optimized. I have seen poorly coded and set up sites go down with less than a hundred visitors a day, while well coded sites have 10’s of thousands of visitors a day.

(12:57 am) [Bob]: 10’s of thousands of visitors per day on a shared plan?

(12:57 am) [Bob]: Wow

(12:58 am) [Bob]: OK. Another question. Why does your VPS plan cost $70 and only have 120 GB of storage and 1.5TB of bandwidth while your shared plans (about twenty times less money) have unlimited bandwidth and unlimited storage space?

(12:58 am) [JJ] It all depends on how well you have the site set up. With a WordPress site, 1,500 unique visitors a day is very doable.

(12:59 am) [Bob]: I just don’t understand it. Why would anyone get the VPS when you get more resources and bandwidth with the shared plan?

(1:00 am) [JJ] A VPS has root access, no restrictions on PHP settings or emails.

(1:00 am) [JJ] It is also able to run software we do not allow on our shared servers.

(1:00 am) [Bob]: OK. but I can have a website with 1TB of storage and unlimited bandwidth on a shared plan for $4 but I am severely limited on a plan that costs $70?

(1:01 am) [Bob]: That makes no sense whatsoever.

(1:03 am) [Bob]: Is it really unlimited? Can I run a family photo website with a terabyte or two of files on the shared plan? Really? And do I really have unlimited bandwidth? Does that mean I can have unlimited traffic?

(1:03 am) [Bob]: It sort of feels as though you’re giving me the runaround.

(1:04 am) [JJ] Shared hosting space may not be used for storage (whether of media, emails, or other data).

(1:05 am) [Bob]: No, it would be for a family website. Photos.

(1:05 am) [Bob]: I am a photographer.

(1:05 am) [JJ] If it is part of your site, then you can store a terabyte of images.

(1:05 am) [Bob]: I would post my work on the website. I already have it stored and backed up right here in my house. I don’t need your servers for storage. I need your servers to display the photos on my website.

(1:06 am) [Bob]: OK.

(1:08 am) [Bob]: I am wondering if all these things are really unlimited. Bandwidth. Storage. Domains. I’m trying to get a straight answer. Can I use 5TB of bandwidth on a shared plan? 80TB of storage? 5,000,000 visitors per month? 10,000 domains? Something MUST be limited on the shared plans. What is limited? Or does HostGator simply offer unlimited services because they know that 80% of users aren’t really going to use a fraction of the resources?

(1:11 am) [JJ] Yes, all that is unlimited. The only restrictions on the shared hosting have to do with the CPU/RAM usage.

(1:11 am) [Bob]: OK. What are those limitations?

(1:15 am) [JJ] HostGator allows a maximum of 25% CPU/RAM usage limit. You may exceed this limit for no longer than 90 seconds.

(1:15 am) [Bob]: What happens if the limit is exceeded? And how is that measured?

(1:19 am) [Bob]: ??

(1:21 am) [JJ] If you exceed the limit we will place a restriction on the account. Whether it is temporary one to notify you of an issue or a more permanent one would depend on how excessive the usage and how many times we have had to restrict the account.

(1:22 am) [Bob]: How is the CPU / RAM usage measured? What if I’m getting 1,500 unique visitors on a WordPress site that has 15-20 plugins running and has some spambot troubles? Will I be in danger of the CPU limit?

(1:25 am) [JJ] I am not sure what you mean by how is it measured. If you are using 25% of the total CPU available or 25% of the RAM available then you would receive a restriction. Yes WordPress running that many plugins can hit a restriction with very few visistors.

(1:25 am) [Bob]: OK. thanks for all your help.

(1:26 am) [Bob]: I still don’t understand the VPS vs. shared and why anyone would pay more for less but maybe someday I will get it.

(1:26 am) [Bob]: goodnight.

(1:29 am) [JJ] As I said the VPS has a lot more freedom in what can be installed and run on it.

(1:29 am) [JJ] Is there anything else I can assist you with?

(1:30 am) [Bob]: OK No. Nothing else. thank you.

(1:34 am) [JJ] Thank you for using HostGator Live Chat. If you could take a minute to let us know if your questions were answered and/or your support request was resolved, it would help us to improve our customer service. To do that, just click the button that says “Rate and Exit” in the upper right hand corner. The survey takes less than a minute to fill out.

(1:34 am) [System] Chat closed by customer request.


Let’s examine some of the ridiculous statements in the above chats as we seek to find the truth about web hosting.

Inmotion’s Ridiculous Statements

I can’t really find any ridiculous statements from Inmotion. They have adopted the same marketing ploys that others have, but when pressed, at least they admitted it. The technician stated as clearly as he seemed able the limitations. He also accurately assessed that a WordPress site receiving 1,000 unique visitors per day might be in need of a VPS. I know he is correct because when I was on shared hosting, my highly optimized WordPress site receiving about 1,500 unique visitors each day was consistently over-using its allotted CPU resources and I had to upgrade to a VPS.


Bluehost’s Ridiculous Statements

(22:31) [Bob] oh, so is that like visitors visiting my pages?

(22:31) [AD] Right.

Bandwidth is not the number of visitors a site receives. If bandwidth was the same thing as the number of visitors, why does the Cadillac of web hosting, WP Engine, offer unlimited bandwidth but a limit of 100,000 visitors per month? Try a search for “bandwidth versus traffic” and see for yourself. If “AD” was right, then I could literally have millions of visitors per month on my shared Bluehost account.

(22:32) [Bob] OK. I see. So that means I can have unlimited hits?

(22:33) [AD] Correct.

If I can’t have unlimited hits on a $100 per month managed hosting plan from WP Engine, I’d bet my wife’s savings I can’t have unlimited hits on a $4 shared Bluehost plan. My own experience tells me that about 1,000 unique visitors per day on a WordPress website (that admittedly had some bot issues) is about as much as a shared plan can handle.

(22:33) [Bob] Great.. OK. So 1,000,000 hits per month wouldn’t be any problem for your shared plans?

(22:34) [AD] As long as it stays within the cpu limits.

What “AD” fails to say here is that if a site was getting 1,000,000 hits per month it wouldn’t even be close to staying within any shared hosting plan’s CPU limits (however those are measured).

(22:39) [Bob] OK. I also have about 500GB of pictures to upload. That would be no problem right because you have unlimited storage on your shared hosting.

(22:40) [AD] Correct.

I challenge anyone on a shared server to try uploading 500GB of files. See what happens. Sorry AD, but either you don’t know or you’re a blatant liar. My guess is that you just don’t know.


HostGator’s Ridiculous Statements

Before I post this web host’s ridiculous statements, I want to remind folks that I waited 52 minutes to talk to a sales representative. If it takes them 52 minutes to talk to potential customers, what does that say about the wait times to talk to technical support? On to the ridiculous statements . . .

(12:55 am) [Bob]: OK how does that transfer into site traffic? I don’t have any idea what you’re saying. If I get 1,500 unique visitors each day on a WordPress site, would that be fine for your shared hosting plans?

(12:57 am) [JJ] Certainly, as long as your site is well optimized. I have seen poorly coded and set up sites go down with less than a hundred visitors a day, while well coded sites have 10’s of thousands of visitors a day.

(12:57 am) [Bob]: 10’s of thousands of visitors per day on a shared plan?

(12:57 am) [Bob]: Wow

JJ suggests that a WordPress website that is well-coded can run smoothly on a shared server while receiving tens of thousands of visitors per day. That is something I’d like to see. Can anyone corroborate this? Calling all webmasters! Who has successfully run a WordPress site receiving tens of thousands of daily visitors on a shared hosting plan? Hello? Anyone there? I didn’t think so.

(1:05 am) [JJ] If it is part of your site, then you can store a terabyte of images.

It’s getting late and I’m getting tired. I’m almost feeling like being rude. But I’ll stifle my inappropriate comments and just say this — no web host will allow anyone to upload a terabyte of files for their website. No web host would allow anyone to upload even half that amount. HostGator’s Standard dedicated hosting plan includes a 1 terabyte hard drive. Cost? $219 per month. Even with that plan, you couldn’t upload a full terabyte of files.

The problem here is that the technician was unwilling to admit that offering unlimited bandwidth and storage space on a $4 is nothing more than a marketing ploy. At least the technician from Inmotion could admit it.

(1:08 am) [Bob]: I am wondering if all these things are really unlimited. Bandwidth. Storage. Domains. I’m trying to get a straight answer. Can I use 5TB of bandwidth on a shared plan? 80TB of storage? 5,000,000 visitors per month? 10,000 domains? Something MUST be limited on the shared plans. What is limited? Or does HostGator simply offer unlimited services because they know that 80% of users aren’t really going to use a fraction of the resources?

(1:11 am) [JJ] Yes, all that is unlimited. The only restrictions on the shared hosting have to do with the CPU/RAM usage.

Ah, now the truth is starting to emerge. There is a limit. A CPU limit. And the CPU limit effectively limits everything else.


Conclusion — The Truth About Web Hosting

Here’s the truth about web hosting (if you haven’t already figured it out). Their marketing practices are deceptive. They often say that they offer unlimited bandwidth (not true) and unlimited storage (again, not true). I have used shared hosting for years and I can say with certainty that even a very well-maintained, highly efficient, cached, minified and secured WordPress website running 15-20 plugins receiving 1,000 to 1,500 unique visitors every day will not run well on a shared plan. Period.

They all say “unlimited bandwidth” (now called “unmetered” on some hosts) and “unlimited storage” and they have language to back that up. But they all have CPU limitations, something that is never mentioned in their marketing. Inmotion can’t quantify CPU usage, but at least the technician was able to tell me that if my site affects others on the shared server, then it’s going to be a problem. Bluehost says you can use 7% of an 8-core setup and if you use more, your site will be throttled. Try googling “Bluehost throttled my site” for some entertaining reading. HostGator says if you’re using 25% of the total available CPU then your site will be restricted. But the technician was unable to say how they measure CPU usage. Bottom line? Unlimited anything is a lie.

Sadly, this is common marketing practice among the popular web hosts, and even the good ones need to use similar tactics to remain competitive. Why would anyone (anyone who didn’t know the truth about web hosting) choose a host that caps storage space and bandwidth on a shared plan when all the other hosts offer unlimited storage space and bandwidth?

If you’re planning on starting a website, shared hosting can work. And it can work very well. But if your site starts getting getting some real traffic (over 500 unique visitors per day) you may want to start looking into other options.


Full Disclosure

I am in Inmotion affiliate. In the world of web hosts and misleading marketing practices, they are, quite simply, the best. That is why I’m an affiliate just for them. I only recommend what I’ve used. I’ve used multiple hosts over the years and I’ve been with Inmotion now for about three or four years. This site is hosted with Inmotion on a VPS plan. I don’t agree with their marketing practices however, and I think they should change them. But if I were to score the technicians in the chats above, on honesty and knowledge, I’d say the Inmotion technician won the battle, hands-down.


Free Support for Your Blog

As always, I offer free support for your WordPress blog or website, with special consideration for those who’ve watched my video tutorials and signed up with Inmotion as their host.

15 Comments


  1. Hi Bob!

    I can’t tell you how much intrigued i was with this article!

    Just last night, i’ve experiencing the same conversation with inmotion hosting’s customer service..

    I did select for sales department and somehow it was connected to billing department.. And the good part was the honesty, he asked me to wait for the correct department to come.

    Still, i don’t get why the plans doesn’t really tell you about the resource you will get..

    I’m on VPS now, @digitalocean 10GB plans, and i really need to know which plans will give me more resource, and why..

    I wonder if you could help me with this, Bob? Thank you so much!

    Reply

  2. Well, I’m not really Bob, but sure, I can help you. You’ll have to be a bit more specific however, before I can really answer your questions. What sorts of resources do you need? What sort of website are you running?

    Reply

  3. Interesting! I get it now. The guy from InMotion seems to be more honest and open.

    Reply

  4. Hello,

    Comment 1 of 2 🙂

    I read this post with delight since that exactly what I’ve been doing with different web hosting customer support. I’m currently with HG baby and one of my websites keeps going down sporadically for less than 1000 visitors a day. Now I’m putting together a bunch of websites for a client and evaluating whether to go with another host, since I also need secure sites. All the websites will have WP as the CMS. I’ve spent the better part of a week reading through everything I could find, reviews, chatting with customer reps, sending queries out and what not.

    I was almost about to close on SiteGround GrowBig because of some great features and great price.
    1. Unlimited websites
    2. Free domain
    3. Servers around the world / SSD
    4. Free CF CDN
    5. HTTP/2 support
    6. Three level super cacher
    7. Wildcard SSL cert + dedicated IP, free for 1 year
    8. Allows free Lets Encrypt SSL

    But the GrowBig plan mentioned 25K visitor suitability which is making me worried. If I assume only 12 hours of traffic (country centric sites), then thats provisioning for 1 visit a minute (25000 / 30 days / 12 hours / 60 mins), which is ridiculous. Why do I need to pay for fancy-ass hosting to get that kind of traffic provisioning?

    I chatted with their customer support who said that “that number is not a limit at all we have decided to set such numbers just to guide the customers who start hosting for first time which plan will fit their needs. But we will never limit your website or account if you have more visisotrs”… which is totally at odds with what many people have said.

    Later she said “we will monitor your account 24/7 and if we detect that you need more server resources you will be contacted and we will assist you in upgrading the account”.

    From their website I see they allow 600,000 CPU seconds a month. I am unable to find a good estimate of how many CPU seconds each visit on average would take, but lets assume a conservative 5 secs; that should still allow 120K visitors, which is an order of magnitude above the number of 25K they are working with.

    May I request your views.

    Reply

    1. On my busiest site I get about 3,000 unique visitors per day. I’ve never had any issue whatsoever with my VPS.

      Reply

  5. Comment 2 of 2 🙂

    After various eval, I’m down to InMotion or SiteGround. In fact searching for more data on InMotion got me to your site.

    I chatted with InMotion with the following query: Hello, I’m evaluating between you guys and SiteOrigin. Need to understand what limits are there for “power” plan. CPU cycles, IOs, concurrent users, monthy views? How do you measure? Are they hard limits, and will you immediately shut down the website, or is there graceful degradation? Thanks.

    Answer: The Power plan will provide up to 2GB of RAM, 80% of one CPU core, 1.5 disk I/O and 80 concentric connections. These are not hard limits unless the limitations are surpassed very significantly. The Pro plan allows up to 4GB of RAM, 100% of one CPU core, 2 MB/s I/O, with 120 concentric connections.

    So in this case, its a little harder to guess where the limit would be. I’m surprised that you hit 600pc CPU usage with just 3500 visits (as per http://myboringchannel.net/the-best-web-host-there-is-no-such-thing/)

    What is your opinion of SiteGround? Any particular reason why you did not evaluate them as part of this exercise.

    Thanks for any insights you may be able to provide!

    Reply

    1. SiteGround is an excellent host from what I’ve heard. I’ve never used them so can’t speak specifically to their offerings. But I have used Inmotion and I know how good they’ve been for me.

      Reply

  6. Hi,

    I received email “your web hosting account is approaching or exceeding its resource limits.

    This is the first WordPress site I built for my blog. I redirected my old blog to WP. In the two weeks since it’s been up, I have had about 1,500 visitors. Should I add resources to my server, which I now understand is a shared server (godaddy), or do I switch to VPS? Thanks for all advice!

    Reply

    1. Hi there . . . sorry for the late reply. I wouldn’t bother adding resources or switching until GoDaddy says something to you, like, “Hey, you’re using too many system resources!” Then I’d switch to Inmotion! 😉

      Reply

  7. I am also using shared hosting. And my host also said that there is unlimited resources available. But it is not unlimited because I have seen it many times my site goes hang if sudden traffic increase or some times when I scan my site with Wordfence Security or when I optimize images with EWWW optimizer. And when I contacted with them about the issue. They said my site is limited to 30 entry processes. So it is confirmed that all the companies making us fool by saying it is unlimited but it is not.

    Reply

  8. To be honest, that “unlimited hosting” never worked for me. I was advised to upgrade even at 10GB of storage usage and 1000 visitors per month. That is very unprofessional so I decided not to use this type of hosting anymore. At this moment, I am using a VPS at Rosehosting and I really like the service. At least, I get what I am paying for and I know exactly how much resources I can use.

    Reply

    1. I totally agree with your assessment. If you can’t handle the storage then don’t advertise unlimited.

      Reply

  9. very intriguing article regarding webhosting comparison. Must have taken some serious time to put together. Thank you for sharing the info! I’ve long suspected there was A LOT of marketing BS when it comes to webhosting companies. This definitely confirms my suspicions.

    Reply

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